August 24-27 2016
Georgia World Congress Center Atlanta Georgia USA
Check the latest article for IWF atlanta users

Layering Color

by Dakota 8. August 2016 08:32

Layering Color

Mitch Kohanek

When you have damage to the object that includes the loss of the substrate and color, you have a variety of choices of materials to fill the void. These different filling materials come in a wide range of colors to assist you in establishing the background color you need. 

For some repairs, the correct color of filler and a couple of grain lines is all you might need. For repairs requiring more detail, it is going to be more important to concentrate on the colors that go on top of the filled area. The more you understand color, the fewer repair sticks and the fewer powders you actually need. 

Hue is another name for color. If you are able to identify earth tone colors, you would say that the object has a warm burnt umber hue shaded with raw umber hue. If no color name comes to mind, you would begin by identifying the color as having a "warm" or "cool" hue. Warm hues are an orange or reddish hue while cool colors are a greenish or blue hue.

When trying to reestablish color on the repair, if mixing colors together does not work, you will need to layer a color on top of a color. 

Layering thin layers of color on top of the fill allows you to have more color control. An example would be layering your colors from warm to cool. Establishing a yellow background of dye or pigment on the filled area, followed by a warm brown such as burnt umber will create a "brown" you can't make by mixing the two together. A light layer of green, such as raw umber on top of that color will "cool" that color. 

Once you learn how to layer your colors, the color of the filler material is not as critical. 

Tags: