Tuesday - Friday | August 25-28, 2020

Georgia World Congress Center | Atlanta, GA | USA

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ENHANCING ROUGHMILL PERFORMANCE

20. April 2016 08:29

ENHANCING ROUGHMILL PERFORMANCE

By:  Eugene Wengert, President: The Wood Doctor's Rx

The main purpose of a rough mill is to make a profit (or contribute to the overall profit).  the profit is a result of making a better product that is worth more, wasting less, and finding trouble spots before they are a disaster. The manufacturing of parts is therefore a means to an end.  So, what are the nine main factors that affect rough mill profitability?  How can I work with these factors to improve profitability in my operation.  VERY SPECIFIC INFO IS GIVEN.

Come learn more about this topic at Rx for Enhancing Roughmill Performance session at the IWF 2016 Education Conference.

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Gaining an Edge with Tooling

19. April 2016 14:23

Gaining an Edge with Tooling

Nearly 20 years ago, when I was programming my first CNC, I had a chance to have a tooling rep come out to my shop and share his knowledge with me. At the time I was running a large batch of parts that each took about 40 minutes to mill on the machine. He handed me a sample tool to mount in the CNC and try out. Once it was set up he told me the feed rate and rpm to use. I was convinced that the bit would simply snap, but he said, “It’s my tool, so don’t worry about it.” That tool, the first spiral bit I had seen, did not snap, and literally reduced my program run down to 15 minutes per piece.

This is where I first came to appreciate the value of choosing the right tooling. It is where the work gets done. Where the “rubber meets the road”, and using the wrong tool for the job is like putting street tires on a race car. You will end up in a ditch.

Tooling companies spend a tremendous amount of time and money on developing the blades and bits that they sell, and there is a surprising amount of science that goes into making them. The good news for you is that while you need to be aware of the value of proper tooling, you do not need to spend a lot of your limited time educating yourself. You have the option of building relationships with experts in the field.

Tooling dealers who stock a variety of manufacturer’s brands are a great source of expertise you can tap into. They may be a bit more expensive to buy from, but they can save you a ton on money in the long run because they know what is out there and save you the time of chasing down specialty cutters you may need, leaving you free to do what you do best.

Manufacturer’s reps can also be highly valuable. Yes, they represent one brand and want you to buy their brand, but they are often available to visit your shop, watch what you are doing as you do it, and even let you try out different tools before you buy them. 

A third option is to maintain a relationship with your equipment manufacturers. The folks who make and sell expensive equipment have a vested interest in their customers being well satisfied with their machines, and they know all too well that the wrong tooling can effect this satisfaction. 

What does all this have to do with “The Magic of Custom Tooling” seminar at IWF this year? It’s simple. Unless you recognize how big an impact choosing the right “off the shelf” tools can be for your business, it is a lot harder to see how much there is to be gained through the use of custom tooling. It goes way beyond matching profiles.

Submitted by: Ralph Bagnall, Owner: ConsultingWoodworker.com

 

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MOISTURE- -EFFECTS AND MEASUREMENT

18. April 2016 07:45

MOISTURE- -EFFECTS AND MEASUREMENT

By:  Eugene Wengert, President: The Wood Doctor's Rx

At least 3/4 of all wood manufacturing defects are related to or caused by moisture.  This seminar will discuss the answers to questions:   How do I measure the MC of lumber or manufactured pieces of wood?  What are the main characteristics of moisture meters?  What are the potential trouble areas?  Why do two different meters not always agree?  Are the “fancy” parts of moisture meters (including memory, average MC, standard deviation, temperature correction, species correction) essential and useful?  Some newer moisture meters will be available for inspection.  VERY PRACTICAL.

Come learn more about this topic at MOISTURE: Effects and Measurement session at the IWF 2016 Education Conference.

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MOISTURE - EFFECTS AND MEASUREMENT

14. April 2016 09:34

MOISTURE - EFFECTS AND MEASUREMENT

By:  Eugene Wengert, President: The Wood Doctor's Rx

At least 3/4 of all wood manufacturing defects are related to or caused by moisture.  This session will begin with answers to the following questions:  How is wood moisture content (MC) related to temperature and humidity of the air?  What changes in wood occur when the MC changes, including swelling and shrinking?  Why do defects mostly show up within the first month or two after manufacturing, but seldom after a year or more later?  What is the correct MC for lumber and wood products?  How can I control MC after the lumber leaves the kiln?  VERY PRACTICAL.

Come learn more about this topic at MOISTURE: Effects and Measurement session at the IWF 2016 Education Conference.

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Social Media: What’s the Big Deal?

11. April 2016 12:25

Social Media:  What’s the Big Deal? 

By: Iris Montague, Research Forester: USDA Forest Service; Kathryn Arano, Associate Professor of Forest Resources Management: West Virginia University and Jan Wiedenbeck, Team Leader/Research Forest Products Technologis: USDA Forest Service

 During the past two decades, the technology advances have greatly exceeded imagination. A world that once depended largely on printed material has become heavily digitalized. These technologies allow companies and consumers to be more productive and efficient in everyday activities. Companies are no longer dependent solely on newspapers, magazines, billboards, or mass mailings to market products or distribute company information. Individuals can gather information about favorite products and keep in touch with friends, family, and colleagues all at the same time. Many studies have shown that companies that are early adopters of new technology frequently are more successful in business applications. However, with the current economic climate, many companies must be careful in their capital allocation. Yet, one technological advance, the Internet, may help companies market their products and improve business functions with very little expense to them.

Internet usage has grown exponentially since it was introduced for commercial use in the early 1990’s (All About Market Research 2010). Within 5 years of its introduction, the number of users increased from 16 million to 248 million. Today, according to Internet World Stats (November, 2015), there are almost 3.4 billion Internet users world-wide – 46 percent of the World’s population.  In North America, 88 percent of the population uses the Internet.  According to a recent study, 80 percent of Americans 18 years or older use the Internet and they spend an average of 13 hours per week online at home. The Internet also has had a great impact on companies globally. It is at once a world-wide broadcasting mechanism, a channel for information dissemination, and a medium for collaboration and interaction between individuals and their computers without regard for geographic location (Internet Society 2012).

A new Internet trend, social media networking, has had an even greater impact on the development and maintenance of social relationships. Social media can be defined as any online tool that allows social interaction between groups of people through the sharing of content, profiles, opinions, insights, experiences, and perspectives. These tools may include message boards, podcasts, blogs, micro blogs, lifestreams, bookmarks, networks, communities, wikis, and vlogs. Currently, there are hundreds of social media network sites available online that cover a wide range of interests (e.g., business, politics, dating, cooking, fashion) and cater to just about every demographic group. Although the social networking services Twitter and Facebook have garnered a lot of attention in the entertainment world, these sites also have been successful in business applications. Facebook and Twitter, as well as other social media sites, provide businesses the mechanism to develop social relationships with their customers. These social media sites have allowed businesses to have “up close and personal” relationships with countless consumers, a connection that was not possible before the introduction of the Internet and social media.

Companies all over the world have responded to the strategic and operational benefits attributed to using social media as a marketing tool. Some of these benefits include gaining comprehensions into consumer behavior and preferences; urging consumers to share the brand’s message as word of mouth to their peers; increasing brand message exposure; connecting to consumers for research and development; building and increasing brand awareness; increasing brand equity; improving search engine rankings; and driving traffic to corporate websites (Trusov et al. 2009; Palmer and Koenig-Lewis 2009; Lebherz 2011). The forest products industry has thrived on communicating with and strengthening bonds within a specifically defined community (Koenig 2009). Facebook and Twitter, as well as other social media sites, provide businesses the mechanism to further develop social relationships with their customers. These close relationships were harder to cultivate with dozens to thousands of customers before the introduction of the Internet and social media. There is an opportunity, so far largely untapped, for the forest products industry to benefit from the enhanced relationships these tools create.

Join us at IWF 2016 Education Conference  for our sessions, "Social Media Tips and Trends for the Forest Product Industry" as we share information with you on how you can improve your social media game plan to achieve your business and marketing goals more effectively.

All About Market Research. 2010. Internet Growth and Stats: Today's Road to eCommerce and Global Trade. http://www.allaboutmarketresearch.com/Internet.htm

Internet Society. 2012. http://www.Internetsociety.org/Internet/Internet-51/history-Internet/briefhistory-Internet

Internet World Stats. 2015. Internet World Stats: Usage and Population Statistics.

http://www.Internetworldstats.com/stats.htm

Koenig, D. 2009. Lumber dealers cautious about social media. Hardwood Matters December: 8–10.

Palmer, A. and N. Koenig-Lewis. 2009. An experiential, social network based approach to direct marketing. Direct Mark. Int. J. 3(3):162–176.

Trusov, M., R. E. Bucklin, and K. H. Pauwels. 2009. Effects of word of mouth versus traditional marketing: Findings from an Internet Social Networking Site. J. Mark. 73(5):90–102.

Lebherz, P. R. 2011. Relevant factors for the impact of social media marketing strategies: empirical study of the internet travel sector. B.S. Thesis. Karlsruher Institut für Technologie. 119 p.

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